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Karen Bespalov
Karen Bespalov

The Benefits of Using the Little Red Book AA Free 46 for Studying and Applying the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous


What is the Little Red Book AA Free 46?




If you are an alcoholic who is looking for a way to recover from your addiction and live a sober and happy life, you may have heard of the Little Red Book AA Free 46. This is a book that has helped millions of alcoholics around the world to understand and follow the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, the most successful and widely recognized program for overcoming alcoholism. But what is this book, and how can it help you?




the little red book aa free 46


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Introduction




The Little Red Book AA Free 46 is a short and simple guide to the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. It is designed to help alcoholics who are new to AA or who want to refresh their knowledge of the program. It is not a substitute for the Big Book, which is the main text of Alcoholics Anonymous, but rather a companion that summarizes and interprets the Twelve Steps in a clear and practical way.


History




The Little Red Book AA Free 46 was first published in 1946 by Hazelden Foundation, a nonprofit organization that provides addiction treatment and recovery services. It was written by Bill W., one of the founders of Alcoholics Anonymous, with contributions from other AA members. It evolved from a series of notes that Bill W. originally prepared as Twelve Step suggestions for AA beginners. The book was intended to aid in the study of the Big Book and to provide many helpful topics for discussion meetings.


Content




The Little Red Book AA Free 46 contains four main sections: an introduction to the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, a detailed explanation of each step, a section on the benefits of using the book, and a section on how to get the book. The book also includes two appendices: one with questions and answers about AA, and one with a list of dos and don'ts for AA members.


The book covers all aspects of the AA program and philosophy, such as:


  • The nature and consequences of alcoholism



  • The admission of powerlessness over alcohol and unmanageability of life



  • The belief in a higher power that can restore sanity



  • The decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him



  • The inventory of our moral defects and wrongs



  • The confession of our faults to God, ourselves, and another human being



  • The readiness and willingness to have God remove our shortcomings



  • The amends we make to those we have harmed



  • The maintenance of our spiritual condition through daily inventory, prayer, and meditation



  • The service we render to other alcoholics and people in need



  • The spiritual awakening we experience as a result of these steps



The book also offers practical advice on how to apply these steps in our daily lives, such as:


  • How to find a sponsor and work with him or her



  • How to attend and participate in AA meetings



  • How to deal with temptations and relapses



  • How to cope with emotions and relationships



  • How to handle problems and challenges



  • How to grow spiritually and mentally



  • How to enjoy life without alcohol



The Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous




The core of the Little Red Book AA Free 46 is the explanation of the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. These are the steps that have helped millions of alcoholics achieve sobriety and recovery by following a spiritual way of life. The steps are based on the principles of honesty, faith, surrender, courage, integrity, humility, forgiveness, justice, perseverance, awareness, service, and love.


Step One




We admitted we were powerless over alcoholthat our lives had become unmanageable.


Step Two




Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.


This is the second step in AA, where we start to develop a spiritual foundation for our recovery. We realize that we cannot overcome alcoholism by our own strength or intelligence, that we need a higher power that can help us and heal us. We understand that alcoholism is a form of insanity, a mental and spiritual illness that distorts our perception of reality and ourselves. We become open-minded and willing to explore the concept of a higher power that can restore us to sanity.


The higher power can be anything or anyone that we choose to believe in, as long as it is not ourselves or alcohol. It can be God, nature, the universe, the AA group, or any other source of inspiration and guidance. The important thing is that we have faith in something that is bigger and stronger than us, something that can give us hope and direction.


Step Three




Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.


This is the third step in AA, where we make a commitment to follow the path of recovery with the help of our higher power. We decide to surrender our will and our lives to the care of God as we understood Him. We let go of our self-will, our ego, our pride, and our fears. We trust that God has a plan for us and that He will take care of us. We accept His will for us and His guidance for us.


Step Four




Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.


This is the fourth step in AA, where we take a honest and thorough look at ourselves and our past. We make a list of all our moral defects and wrongs, such as resentment, anger, fear, guilt, shame, selfishness, dishonesty, pride, envy, lust, greed, gluttony, sloth, etc. We also list all the people we have harmed or affected by our drinking and our behavior. We examine how our defects and wrongs have affected us and others. We try to be objective and realistic, neither exaggerating nor minimizing our faults.


This step requires courage and humility. It is not easy to face our dark side and admit our mistakes. But it is necessary to clear away the wreckage of our past and make room for a new life. It is also a relief to get rid of the secrets and burdens that have been weighing us down. It is a way of freeing ourselves from the bondage of self.


Step Five




Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.


This is the fifth step in AA, where we share our inventory with someone else. We choose a person who is trustworthy, understanding, and supportive, such as our sponsor, a clergyman, a counselor, or a friend. We tell them everything we have written in our inventory, without hiding or holding back anything. We admit to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.


Steps Six and Seven




Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.


Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.


These are the sixth and seventh steps in AA, where we prepare ourselves for a change of personality and character. We become entirely ready to have God remove all our defects of character that we have identified in our inventory. We realize that we cannot change ourselves by our own efforts, that we need God's help and grace. We become willing to let go of our old ways of thinking and behaving, and to adopt new ones that are more in harmony with God's will for us. We humbly ask Him to remove our shortcomings and to replace them with His virtues and gifts.


These steps require willingness and humility. It is not easy to give up our defects and shortcomings, especially those that we have grown attached to or that have served us as coping mechanisms. But it is necessary to make room for a new and better self, one that is more honest, loving, generous, humble, grateful, etc. It is also a rewarding and transforming experience. It helps us to grow spiritually and mentally, to become more like the person God wants us to be.


Steps Eight and Nine




Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.


Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.


These are the eighth and ninth steps in AA, where we repair the damage we have done to others by our drinking and our behavior. We make a list of all the people we have harmed or affected by our actions or inactions, such as family, friends, co-workers, employers, creditors, strangers, etc. We include ourselves in this list, as we have also harmed ourselves by our alcoholism. We become willing to make amends to them all, which means to apologize sincerely, to make restitution where possible, and to change our attitude and behavior towards them. We make direct amends to such people wherever possible, face-to-face or by phone or letter, except when to do so would injure them or others, such as by reopening old wounds or causing unnecessary trouble.


Step Ten




Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.


This is the tenth step in AA, where we maintain our spiritual condition and our progress in recovery. We continue to take personal inventory on a daily basis, which means to review our thoughts, words, and actions, and to check if they are in line with the AA principles and values. We also monitor our emotions and reactions, and identify any signs of resentment, fear, guilt, or selfishness. When we find that we have done something wrong or harmful, we promptly admit it and make amends if necessary. We also acknowledge and appreciate the good things we have done or received.


This step requires vigilance and honesty. It is not easy to keep track of our behavior and to admit our faults. But it is necessary to prevent the accumulation of negative emotions and habits that could lead us back to drinking. It is also a beneficial and rewarding experience. It helps us to improve our character and our relationships, to avoid unnecessary problems and conflicts, and to enjoy a happy and sober life.


Step Eleven




Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.


This is the eleventh step in AA, where we deepen our spiritual connection and our reliance on our higher power. We seek through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, which means to communicate with Him regularly and sincerely, to listen to His voice and guidance, and to express our gratitude and love for Him. We pray only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out, which means to ask Him what He wants us to do and how He wants us to live, and to trust Him to give us the strength and the courage to follow His will.


Step Twelve




Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.


This is the twelfth and last step in AA, where we share our experience, strength, and hope with others who are still suffering from alcoholism. We try to carry this message to alcoholics, which means to offer them our help and support, to tell them about the AA program and how it has worked for us, and to invite them to join us in recovery. We also try to practice these principles in all our affairs, which means to apply the AA principles and values in every aspect of our lives, such as our work, our family, our community, etc.


This step requires generosity and responsibility. It is not easy to reach out to other alcoholics and to live by the AA principles in all situations. But it is necessary to fulfill our primary purpose and our social duty. It is also a fulfilling and rewarding experience. It helps us to stay sober and grateful, to help others and ourselves, and to make a positive difference in the world.


Conclusion




The Little Red Book AA Free 46 is a valuable resource for anyone who wants to recover from alcoholism and live a sober and happy life. It is a concise and clear guide to the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, the most successful and widely recognized program for overcoming alcoholism. It helps alcoholics understand and follow the AA program and philosophy, which are based on spiritual principles and values. It also provides practical advice and guidance for applying the Twelve Steps in daily life.


If you are an alcoholic who is looking for a way out of your addiction and misery, we urge you to get the Little Red Book AA Free 46 and start your journey of recovery with AA. You will find a new way of living that is free from alcohol and full of joy and peace. You will also find a fellowship of people who will support you and love you unconditionally. You will discover that you are not alone, that there is hope, and that there is a solution.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about the Little Red Book AA Free 46:


Q1: What is the difference between the Little Red Book and the Big Book?




A1: The Little Red Book is a companion to the Big Book, which is the main text of Alcoholics Anonymous. The Little Red Book summarizes and interprets the Twelve Steps and provides practical guidance for AA beginners. The Big Book contains the stories and experiences of alcoholics who have recovered through AA.


Q2: Who wrote the Little Red Book?




A2: The Little Red Book was written by Bill W., one of the founders of Alcoholics Anonymous, with contributions from other AA members. It was first published in 1946 by Hazelden Foundation, a nonprofit organization that provides addiction treatment and recovery services.


Q3: How long is the Little Red Book?




A3: The Little Red Book is about 160 pages long, depending on the edition and format. It can be read in one sitting or studied over time as part of an AA program.


Q4: Is the Little Red Book endorsed by Alcoholics Anonymous?




A4: The Little Red Book is not an official publication of Alcoholics Anonymous, but it is widely used and respected by many AA members and groups as a helpful resource for studying and applying the Twelve Steps. It is consistent with the principles and philosophy of AA, but it does not represent the official opinion or policy of AA as a whole.


Q5: Where can I find more information about Alcoholics Anonymous?




A5: You can visit the official website of Alcoholics Anonymous at www.aa.org, where you can find more information about the AA program, literature, meetings, and services. You can also contact your local AA office or group for more support and guidance. 71b2f0854b


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