top of page

Group

Public·18 members
James Cruz
James Cruz

Port Royale 4 'LINK'


Port Royale 4 Copyright 2020 Kalypso Media Group GmbH. Developed by Gaming Minds Studios. Published by Kalypso Media Group GmbH. Port Royale 4 is a trademark of Kalypso Media Group GmbH. All rights reserved. All other logos, copyrights and trademarks are property of their respective owner. Financially supported by Film und Medien Stiftung NRW.




Port Royale 4



Port Royale 4 2020 Kalypso Media Group GmbH. Port Royale is a registered trade mark of Kalypso Media Group GmbH. All rights reserved. Published by Kalypso Media Group GmbH. Developed by Gaming Minds Studios. Nintendo Switch version developed by Independent Arts Software. Published by Kalypso Media Group GmbH. All other logos, copyrights and trademarks are property of their respective owner. Uses FMOD Sound System, Firelight Technologies Pty, Ltd., 1994-2020. Uses Bink Video 1997-2020 by RAD Game Tools, Inc. Financially supported by Film und Medien Stiftung NRW.


To do that, you usually start with a single ship that can be used to perform trade between the various ports spread across the map, carrying needed goods to and fro as you expand your armada and create new fleets. As with all good management games, you are not required to micromanage these trade routes yourself. Instead, you can fully automate them and let the AI handle the minutiae of commodities as you focus on the big picture, which is my favourite way of doing anything.


Setting up a trade route also means understanding the whims of the sea and the trade winds. Sailing into the wind helps you move goods quickly, and avoiding high-wind areas that can cause damage to your ship is equally as important. Doing it while avoiding lulls in the wind patterns can help ensure you get goods to their destination before the winds of fortune shift, too.


Keeping your trade convoys safe means sending ships out on patrol. Patrol mode allows your combat-capable ships to sweep your trade routes, attacking any ships and pirates that come near. You can let your patrol do the work for you, or you can take manual control of your fleet and get hands-on with the turn-based tactical portion of the game. I do like that this combat system is entirely optional as it keeps the game accessible for the players that enjoy tycoon-style games, but maybe not turn-based combat.


Occasionally obtuse and sporting a few UX/UI barnacles, Port Royale 4 could use a little more dry dock time before setting out on the high seas. AI trading bugs and occasionally unfair combat sequences discourage combat, which takes the wind out of the sails of this pirate adventure. Developer Gaming Minds can patch the hull, but they need to do so before people find another ship on which to set sail.


Parents need to know that Port Royale 4 is a historical simulation of naval trade in the Caribbean during the age of European colonization and pirates. Players work to create trade routes between towns to ensure they have everything they need to prosper and be happy while taking care to defend themselves from opportunistic enemies on the high seas. Combat's only a small part of the game -- players see nothing worse than cannons fired and ships sunk -- with the focus set squarely on developing resources, producing goods, and running a profitable trading enterprise. Themes of capitalism and colonialism run strongly throughout. Parents should be aware that a big part of the era's trade involved alcohol and tobacco products, and that players will need to go into business producing, buying, and selling these wares in order to succeed.


PORT ROYALE 4 drops players into the middle of the potentially prosperous but often dangerous world of naval trade during the colonial era in the Caribbean. After playing through multiple tutorials that teach the game's basic mechanics, players can either begin playing freely in a big Caribbean sandbox or take on one of several campaigns as the operator of a trade empire under the viceroy of a specific European nation with the aim of using naval trade to support and grow various settlements. Players can set up trade routes between multiple settlements so that ship convoys can start to move resources and products fabricated in one town to others that need them, aiming to buy low and sell high in order to maximize profits. As the game progresses, players will also be able to establish businesses in these towns to help them grow and meet demands as they arise. As colonies grow, so, too, does competition. You'll need to be on the lookout for rivals looking to attack your convoys, and prepared to defend them in short, turn-based naval battles should cannon balls begin to fly. With success comes fame, which will allow you to negotiate with your nation's viceroy to receive permission to start new types of businesses and perhaps even engage in a bit of piracy yourself. What to do is largely up to you as you navigate the treacherous waters of the Caribbean.


It grows a little repetitive after a while, but this historical simulation ought to scratch an itch for players who relish the idea of establishing and fostering a thriving trade empire. Port Royale 4 nails the commerce portion of the experience, providing a wonderfully in-depth simulation of what it must have been like to run a naval trade business in the colonial era. You'll have control over just about everything, from buying ships, creating convoys, and hiring crew and captains to creating efficient routes based on avoiding enemy patrols while taking advantage of prevailing winds to shorten journeys so you can deliver more goods in less time. And since you can establish your own businesses in home territory, you can strategically plan to meet demands as they come up, ensuring adequate supply while taking advantage of shortages when opportunity presents itself. Bonus: The whole thing looks lovely, especially the details that reveal themselves when quickly scrolling from the world map into towns. You'll feel like you have control of a satellite camera with super zoom.


When you first begin, most of the emphasis is on trade. You start out with a few small ship convoys that can sail to different cities, buying and selling goods along the way. You can do this manually, sending ships to different ports and filling the cargo holds with the various items and goods you need.


The principle of supply and demand is in full effect here, as is a hierarchy of needs. Each city produces certain things, like cotton, fruit, or grain. Big money comes from transporting essential goods from a producer to another city that needs it.


The aim of the game is to build up trade networks between different ports in the Caribbean seas so that your empire can grow. If your home town has a surplus of cotton but no cigars and Tortuga is swimming in cigars but could really do with a cotton bud or two, then striking up a deal between the ports makes good business sense for all parties.


Shrewd investments lead to a bulging bank balance, and at this point, you can throw money at more ships and trade licenses in more ports, or you can build up the production output of your home town so you've got more wares to trade with. You can make your seaside town more attractive to workers by building affordable housing and by making sure there's enough grog to keep everyone merry.


After your payment has been processed, the content will be downloaded to the applicable system linked to the respective Nintendo Account, or respective Nintendo Network ID in the case of Wii U and Nintendo 3DS family systems. This system must be updated to the latest system software and connected to the internet with automatic downloads enabled, and it must have enough storage to complete the download. Depending on the system/console/hardware model you own and your use of it, an additional storage device may be required to download software from Nintendo eShop. Please visit our Support section for more information.


After your payment has been processed, the content will be downloaded to the applicable system linked to your Nintendo Account, or your Nintendo Network ID in the case of Wii U or Nintendo 3DS family systems. This system must be updated to the latest system software and connected to the internet with automatic downloads enabled, and it must have enough storage to complete the download. Depending on the system/console/hardware model you own and your use of it, an additional storage device may be required to download software from Nintendo eShop. Please visit our Support section for more information.


Much like the previous games in the franchise, you are a budding merchant tasked with managing a trade empire at the height of the colonialization of the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. France, England, Spain, and the Netherlands are busy carving up the New World, and you are one of the countless merchants hungry for a piece of that highly lucrative pie.Spain is the only playable nation in the beta build I played, and there is only a portion of the campaign implemented so far. Either way, you start your expedition in the lush Caribbean Sea by choosing from one of several playable character classes. There are four of them so far, each of which comes with two perks, balanced out by one disadvantage that can help dictate your playstyle.


Seeing as how Port Royale is a franchise all about trade between the growing port towns of the Caribbean, most of your time in the game will consist of buying, selling, and shipping goods. There are close to two dozen commodities in the game, divided into four rough categories.You have your basic necessities like grain, vegetables, wood, etc. Demanded commodities are things like fresh meat, tobacco, precious metals, ale, and so on. Crafting components are the items that are needed to create more complex luxuries, like cotton to make fine clothing. Finally, you have luxury items, including the aforementioned fine clothing, furniture, pastries and sweets, and more. 041b061a72


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

  • L E O
    L E O
  • Reno Smidt
    Reno Smidt
  • Тania D
    Тania D
  • Geff Rush
    Geff Rush
Group Page: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page